Focus on Muscle Power in the Horse

Scrol omlaag voor Nederlands


Do you know what happens within your horse’s body while training? A lot more happens than you might think. In this blog, we explain how the horse’s muscles work, where they get their energy from, and why horses get tired?



Summary

The muscle of a horse needs glucose and oxygen to contract.

· A light training utilizes mostly an aerobic pathway, an intensive training mostly an anaerobic pathway.

· The brain signalizes fatigue through organs or muscles when they are in danger.


How do muscles work?

In order to move the body, the horse needs to contract its muscles. To generate the power needed for this, the muscles need energy. A muscle generates energy by using glucose and oxygen, if it is available. In normal metabolic processes, cells respire in order to release energy to fuel their living processes. The respiration can be aerobic, which uses glucose and oxygen, or anaerobic which uses glucose only. This is referred to as aerobic or anaerobic metabolism, respectively. During the course of a training, the pathway changes depending of the amount of oxygen and glucose that is available.

We will discuss four stages of training:

  1. First explosion.

  2. Light training.

  3. Intensive training.

  4. Brain fatigue.

1. First explosion

If a horse suddenly has to run, for example, because it spooks in the field, the muscle first uses the glucose that is stored in the muscle. There is no oxygen at first, so the muscle initially uses the less efficient, anaerobic pathway.

This is why it is important to start with ‘warming-up’ in regular training program. This allows the body to prepare the muscle and increase the blood flow to the muscles that delivers extra oxygen.



2. Light training

In light training, after warming-up there will be enough oxygen transported to the muscle to allow for the highly efficient aerobic metabolism of glucose (see Figure above). A horse can keep this up for a long time. In, for example, a two-hour training in walk, the heart-rate of your horse stays under 100 beats per minute.

The heart-rate is a good indicator for the demand for oxygen in the muscle.

The more oxygen is required, the more blood needs to be pumped to the muscle to bring the oxygen, the higher the heart-rate will be.

3. Intensive training

As a training becomes more intensive, the muscles will first run out of oxygen. On average, this happens at a heart-rate of around 180 beats per minute. This would be, for example, when you ride in canter for six to eight minutes or you ride uphill, or on a rough terrain. When a specific muscle runs out of oxygen varies greatly between horses and depends upon the training level of the horse.

The fitter the horse, the better it is able to bring oxygen to the muscles, and the longer it can rely on the more efficient aerobic metabolism.

If the muscle runs out of oxygen, it will switch to the less efficient anaerobic metabolism. It can now only generate two energy molecule instead of 36. In this process, extra acid (H+) is produced, in the form of lactic acid. This causes acidification and fatigue of the muscle. It is a misconception that lactate is the cause of acidification, lactate actually has many benefits for the muscles in this stage.

What does lactate do?

  • Lactate helps against acidification.

  • Lactate functions as a signal substance.

  • Lactate ensures more energy.

  • During intensive exercise, lactate functions as an energy source for organs, like the heart.

  • After training, it takes an average of three hours for the body to break down the lactate.. Light training



Figure 1. A research in 36 human cyclers showed no relationship between the onset of fatigue and lactate concentrations in the blood. Some athletes could keep on cycling way beyond the anaerobic threshold of 4 mmol/L blood lactate. This indicates that the blood lactate measuring is not a good tool to compare fitness levels between athletes or horses.

4. Fatigue in the brain

An increasing body of research confirms that the muscles probably do not cause the onset of fatigue and are most likely not the limiting factor in performance. Long before the muscles truly run out of glucose and have to utilize lactate as their source of energy, the body sends warning signals to the brain. A lack of oxygen, overheating and a drop in glucose in the blood are all signals to the brain to slow the body down. This prevents the body from overtraining or from injuries occurring, and is vital for the survival of the body. It is very hard for any athlete to ignore these signals and keep training past the barriers of ‘central fatigue’ in the brain.

Keeping the brain motivated in training is a very important aspect of training. Creating a high standard of wellbeing and a positive emotional state will translate directly into better performance. And, as horses are not motivated by medals as humans are, other motivational rewards need to be in place, and applied with perfect timing in training. Horse are very sensitive to pressure release or motivational stroking.

References:

· (In Dutch) Burgerhout, W. G. (2008) Afscheid van melkzuur, deel 1 27: 322. https://doi-org.has.idm.oclc.org/10.1007/BF03077607

· (In Dutch) Burgerhout, W. G. (2009). Afscheid van melkzuur, deel 2. Stimulus, 28(1), 37–49. https://doi.org/10.1007/s12491-009-0005-8

· (In Dutch) Burghout, W. (2017). Visies op vermoeidheid Deel 1: Waarom houdt dat verzuren maar niet op? Sportgericht, 71(5), 20–22.

· Campbell, N. A., Reece, J. B., Urry, L. A., Cain, M. L., Wasserman, S. A., Minorsky, P. V., & Jackson, R. B. (2014). Biology: A Global Approach. “In 10.5 Fermentation and anaerobic respiration enable cells to produce ATP without the use of oxygen.” (pp. 253–256). Essex: Pearson Education Limited.

· Cairns, S. P. (2006). “Lactic Acid and Exercise Performance.” Sports Medicine, 36(4), 279–291. https://doi.org/10.2165/00007256-200636040-00001

· Gladden, L. B. (2004). “Lactate metabolism: a new paradigm for the third millennium.” The Journal of Physiology, 558(1), 5–30. https://doi.org/10.1113/jphysiol.2003.058701

· Hall, M. M., Rajasekaran, S., Thomsen, T. W., & Peterson, A. R. (2016). “Lactate: Friend or Foe.” PM&R, 8(3S), S8–S15.

https://doi.org/10.1016/j.pmrj.2015.10.018

· Hinchcliff, K. W., Kaneps, A. J., & Geor, R. J. (2008). “Equine Exercise Physiology: The Science of Exercise in the Athletic Horse.” Edinburgh: Saunders/Elsevier.

· Noakes, T. D. (2004). “From catastrophe to complexity: a novel model of integrative central neural regulation of effort and fatigue during exercise in humans.” British Journal of Sports Medicine, 38(4), 511–514. https://doi.org/10.1136/bjsm.2003.009860

· Nybo, L., & Rasmussen, P. (2007). “Inadequate Cerebral Oxygen Delivery and Central Fatigue During Strenuous Exercise.” Exercise and Sport Sciences Reviews, 110–118. https://doi.org/10.1097/jes.0b013e3180a031ec


Focus op Spierkracht in het Paard



Weet jij wat er gebeurt in het lichaam van je paard terwijl je traint? Er gebeurt veel meer dan je misschien denkt. In deze blog leggen we uit hoe de spieren van je paard werken, waar ze hun energie vandaan halen en waarom paarden moe worden.



Samenvatting

· De spieren van een paard hebben glucose en zuurstof nodig om samen te trekken.

· Een lichte training maakt vooral gebruik van een aërobe route, een intensieve training vooral van een anaërobe route.

· De hersenen signaleren vermoeidheid via organen en spieren wanneer deze in gevaar zijn.


Hoe werken spieren?

Om het lichaam te kunnen bewegen, moet het paard zijn spieren samentrekken. Om de kracht hiervoor op te wekken, hebben de spieren energie nodig. Een spier wekt energie op door gebruik te maken van glucose en zuurstof, als dit beschikbaar is. In normale stofwisselingsprocessen ademen cellen om energie vrij te geven om hun leefprocessen van brandstof te voorzien. De ademhaling kan aëroob zijn, waarbij gebruik wordt gemaakt van glucose en zuurstof, of anaëroob, waarbij alleen gebruik wordt gemaakt van glucose. Dit wordt respectievelijk aërobe of anaërobe stofwisseling genoemd. In de loop van een training verandert de route afhankelijk van de hoeveelheid zuurstof en glucose die beschikbaar zijn.

We zullen vier fasen van training bespreken:

  1. Eerste explosie;

  2. Lichte training;

  3. Intensieve training;

  4. Mentale vermoeidheid.

1. Eerste explosie

Als een paard plotseling moet rennen, bijvoorbeeld omdat het schrikt in de wei, gebruikt de spier eerst de glucose die opgeslagen is in de spier. Er is in eerste instantie geen zuurstof, dus de spier gebruikt eerst de minder efficiënte, anaërobe route.

Dit is waarom het belangrijk is om te beginnen met een 'warming-up' in het reguliere trainingsschema. Dit geeft het lichaam de kans om de spier voor te bereiden en de bloedtoevoer naar de spieren te verhogen, waardoor er meer zuurstof wordt aangeleverd.



2. Lichte training

Bij lichte training zal er na de warming-up genoeg zuurstof naar de spier gevoerd zijn om de zeer efficiënte aërobe stofwisseling van glucose (zie Figuur hierboven) mogelijk te maken. Een paard kan dit lange tijd volhouden. Tijdens, bijvoorbeeld, een twee-urige training in stap, blijft de hartslag van je paard onder 100 slagen per minuut.


De hartslag is een goede indicator voor de behoefte aan zuurstof in de spier. Hoe meer zuurstof er nodig is, des te meer bloed er naar de spier gepompt moet worden om de zuurstof daar te brengen, en des te hoger de hartslag zal zijn.

3. Intensieve training

Wanneer een training intensiever wordt, zal de zuurstof in de spieren eerst opraken. Gemiddeld gebeurt dit bij een hartslag van ongeveer 180 slagen per minuut. Dit is bijvoorbeeld wanneer je zes tot acht minuten in galop rijdt, of als je bergop of op ruw terrein rijdt. Wanneer de zuurstof opraakt in een specifieke spier, verschilt enorm per paard en is afhankelijk van het trainingsniveau van het paard.


Hoe fitter het paard, hoe beter het in staat is zuurstof naar de spieren te vervoeren, en hoe langer het kan vertrouwen op de efficiëntere anaërobe stofwisseling.


Wanneer de zuurstof in de spier opraakt, zal deze overgaan op de minder efficiënte anaërobe stofwisseling. De spier kan nu maar twee energiemoleculen opwekken in plaats van 36. Tijdens dit proces wordt extra zuur (H+) geproduceerd, in de vorm van melkzuur. Dit zorgt voor verzuring en vermoeidheid van de spier. Het is een misvatting dat lactaat de oorzaak is van verzuring. Lactaat heeft eigenlijk veel waarde voor de spieren in deze fase.

Wat doet lactaat?

  • Lactaat helpt tegen verzuring;

  • Lactaat functioneert als een signaalstof;

  • Lactaat zorgt voor meer energie;

  • Tijdens intensieve oefeningen functioneert lactaat als energiebron voor organen, zoals het hart;

  • Na (lichte) training heeft het lichaam gemiddeld drie uur nodig om het lactaat af te breken.



Figuur 1. Een onderzoek bij 36 menselijke fietsers liet geen relatie zien tussen het ontstaan van vermoeidheid en lactaatconcentraties in het bloed. Sommige atleten konden blijven fietsen tot ver voorbij de drempelwaarde van 4 mmol/L lactaat in het bloed. Dit geeft aan dat het meten van lactaat in het bloed geen goed middel is om fitheid tussen atleten of paarden te vergelijken.

4. Mentale vermoeidheid

Een groeiende hoeveelheid onderzoek bevestigt dat de spieren waarschijnlijk niet de oorzaak zijn van het ontstaan van vermoeidheid en vermoedelijk niet de beperkende factor zijn in prestaties. Lang voordat de glucose in de spieren daadwerkelijk opraakt en de spieren gebruik moeten maken van lactaat als energiebron, stuurt het lichaam waarschuwingssignalen naar de hersenen. Een tekort aan zuurstof, oververhitting en een laag glucosegehalte in het bloed zijn allemaal signalen aan de hersenen om rustiger aan te doen. Dit weerhoudt het lichaam van overtrainen of voorkomt het ontstaan van blessures, en het is cruciaal voor het voortbestaan van het lichaam. Het is heel moeilijk voor atleten om deze signalen te negeren en te blijven trainen voorbij de grenzen van 'centrale vermoeidheid' in de hersenen.


Het gemotiveerd houden van de hersenen tijdens trainen is een belangrijk aspect van training. Het creëren van een hoge standaard voor welzijn en een positieve emotionele staat zullen zich direct vertalen in betere prestaties. En, aangezien paarden niet zoals mensen gemotiveerd worden door medailles, moeten er andere motiverende beloningen voor in de plaats komen, en met perfecte timing worden toegepast in de training. Paarden zijn erg gevoelig voor het loslaten van druk of motiverend aaien.

Bronnen:

· Burgerhout, W. G. (2008) Afscheid van melkzuur, deel 1 27: 322. https://doi-org.has.idm.oclc.org/10.1007/BF03077607

· Burgerhout, W. G. (2009). Afscheid van melkzuur, deel 2. Stimulus, 28(1), 37–49. https://doi.org/10.1007/s12491-009-0005-8

· Burghout, W. (2017). Visies op vermoeidheid Deel 1: Waarom houdt dat verzuren maar niet op? Sportgericht, 71(5), 20–22.

· Campbell, N. A., Reece, J. B., Urry, L. A., Cain, M. L., Wasserman, S. A., Minorsky, P. V., & Jackson, R. B. (2014). Biology: A Global Approach. “In 10.5 Fermentation and anaerobic respiration enable cells to produce ATP without the use of oxygen.” (pp. 253–256). Essex: Pearson Education Limited.

· Cairns, S. P. (2006). “Lactic Acid and Exercise Performance.” Sports Medicine, 36(4), 279–291. https://doi.org/10.2165/00007256-200636040-00001

· Gladden, L. B. (2004). “Lactate metabolism: a new paradigm for the third millennium.” The Journal of Physiology, 558(1), 5–30. https://doi.org/10.1113/jphysiol.2003.058701

· Hall, M. M., Rajasekaran, S., Thomsen, T. W., & Peterson, A. R. (2016). “Lactate: Friend or Foe.” PM&R, 8(3S), S8–S15.

https://doi.org/10.1016/j.pmrj.2015.10.018

· Hinchcliff, K. W., Kaneps, A. J., & Geor, R. J. (2008). “Equine Exercise Physiology: The Science of Exercise in the Athletic Horse.” Edinburgh: Saunders/Elsevier.

· Noakes, T. D. (2004). “From catastrophe to complexity: a novel model of integrative central neural regulation of effort and fatigue during exercise in humans.” British Journal of Sports Medicine, 38(4), 511–514. https://doi.org/10.1136/bjsm.2003.009860

· Nybo, L., & Rasmussen, P. (2007). “Inadequate Cerebral Oxygen Delivery and Central Fatigue During Strenuous Exercise.” Exercise and Sport Sciences Reviews, 110–118. https://doi.org/10.1097/jes.0b013e3180a031ec

Moving together.

Subscribe to our mailinglist
arrow&v
  • Facebook
  • YouTube
  • Instagram