Muscular Pain and Muscle Growth

Scrol omlaag voor Nederlands


Muscular pain, what is it exactly? Where does it come from? How long does it last? Can I train my horse when he is suffering with muscular pain? Do the muscles of my horse grow when he has muscular pain? How fast will strength of the muscles reduce if I stop training? Many equestrians ask these questions. You can find the answers in this blog.



A small test

We were very curious as to if we could to capture muscular pain in photo form, so we carried out a small test. We followed a mare for three days, and filmed her trotting in a straight line on the road. On Day 1, she had a jumping lesson, Days 2 and 3, she was in her field throughout the day (08:00 to 19:30) and had a recovery training on Day 2. In trot, we saw the biggest differences in movement. Below is an image with an overview of the three days. You can see the biggest difference in the angle of the front knee (carpus) - The larger the number of the angle, the less the front knee is bent. In the picture, it is visible that the mare's front knee on Day 2 is bent the least, so the angle is the largest. The cause of this could have been muscular pain.


We also observed a difference in the bending of the joints in the lower leg:

Again, the hip and knee were the least bent. While the hock was used with the same angulation on all three days.


So, the horse in the pictures, probably experienced muscular pain on Day 2. As the joints are least bent on this day.

This has, of course, been a small test for us, but to draw a real conclusion from these findings, more research is required. In addition, there are other symptoms of muscular pain, which did not investigate.

Varying types of pain during and after training.

During and after a training, horses can experience three different types of pain:

1. Acidification: This is when lactate is not able to neutralize the acid that is released during a training.

2. Muscle pain: swelling and inflammation that eventually leads to desired muscle growth, is visible one to two days after training.

3. Tendon and joint pain: The horse can experience this pain during and after training, when warming-up is inadequate.

Muscular pain can lead to muscle restoration.

In the build-up phase of training, in which you want to grow your horse's muscles, you train above the fitness level. This causes cracks in the muscles, which is referred to as ‘micro-damage’. The next step is that inflammation occurs due to this, which can leads eventually to muscle growth. In addition, muscle proteins are also produced, these provide recovery and growth.

A horse with muscular pain will sometimes appear somewhat stiff at the beginning of the training. It will be less supple, and has more difficulty in flexing and bending. The horse will also be slightly reluctant to go forward.

After muscular pain comes muscle growth.

As you train longer at the same intensity, the muscular pain decreases and muscle growth (called hypertrophy) increases.

Presumably a muscle grows as follows:

In the first week of starting with a more intensive training schedule, your horse will incur a relatively large amount of micro-damage and a little muscle growth. The muscle will create more recovery proteins, and less growth proteins.

If you have trained at the same intensity for three weeks, you’ll see more muscle growth and less micro-damage.

After ten weeks of training at the same intensity, the speed of muscle growth increases and the muscular pain diminishes. The proteins that the muscle produces will now be more focused on muscle growth.

This theory is derived from a humane research.



A certain degree of muscular pain is, therefore, needed indirectly for muscle growth. However, muscular pain only will not cause muscle growth. It is the chain reaction that ensures muscle growth when you train at the same level for two to three weeks.

How long does muscular pain actually last?

In the case of micro-damage, your horse can experience the largest amount of muscular pain, 24 to 48 hours after the training. During this period, the process to restore the muscles is at its peak. During this process, inflammatory cells are needed to repair the muscle. This can sometimes be visible in hot and swollen muscles.


Example 1 Building up training:

On Monday, you attended a dressage lesson with an intensity of 80, while your horse’s fitness level is 40. You chose this, because you want your horse to achieve a higher level of fitness. The best time to train again is then on Wednesday. This is because the time when muscle pain is at its peak (24 hours) elapsed. In the intervening day, you can ask your horse to do light gymnastic exercises, this is called recovery training. These trainings are under your horse’s fitness level. The screenshot alongside shows how the training and fitness level appear in Ipos Technology’s Training App. The line represents the fitness level, and the bars are the trainings.

Example 2 Competition:

It's Friday. On Sunday, you have a dressage competition. You still also have a dressage lesson planned before this, but you know that these trainings are always very intensive for your horse. If you go ahead with the high intensity dressage lesson, it could be that your horse will have muscular pain at the time of the competition, and is likely to not be able to complete the dressage test to the best of its abilities, because of it. In this scenario, it is better to keep the intensity level of your dressage training low, and ensure you don’t rise above your horse’s fitness level. In this way, you avoid the scenario in which your horse might have muscular pain on Sunday for the competition. The competition itself should not be above your fitness level.

What happens if you train again too quickly?

The chances of (minor) injuries will increase if you train your horse too early and too intensely. If you train while your horse still has muscular pain, the micro-damage in the muscles can accumulate. In this scenario, the horse’s body has not yet had time enough to repair the damage.

If the training is too heavy (for example , it has a training load of 80, while your horse’s fitness level is 40), while your horse has not recovered yet from a previous training, your horse may show signs of disobedience, and may not be willing to go forward or bend as usual. Ipos Technology’s Training App can help you to load your horse the right amount on the right day. The App calculates your horse’s fitness level. In between discipline-specific training, you add a light, recovery training. These training are typically at, or below your horse’s fitness level.

What happens if you train too late?

It's never bad to plan an extra day of rest. The muscle mass only decreases after two weeks of rest. The longer you wait with exercising, the faster muscle mass decreases. So, it takes quite a long time for muscle mass or muscular strength to diminish. With a good training schedule, you will find out that in the end you may not have to train as much, or as heavily as you are used to, and yet you can still obtain a higher level of fitness of the horse.

Summary:

· Muscular pain is most often the recovery process of muscle damage from training.

· The increase in muscle occurs fastest after ten or more weeks of training.

· There are several types of pain during and/or after a training.

· Muscle pain is worse between 24 and 48 hours after the training.

· When you train too early after an intense training, the muscle damage

accumulates, and the risk of injuries increases.

· Muscle mass diminishes only after two weeks of no training.

· Muscle strength decreases after three to four weeks of no training.

References

· (In Dutch) Burgerhout, W. G. (2008) Afscheid van melkzuur, deel 1 27: 322. https://doi-org.has.idm.oclc.org/10.1007/BF03077607

· Campbell, N. A., Reece, J. B., Urry, L. A., Cain, M. L., Wasserman, S. A., Minorsky, P. V., & Jackson, R. B. (2014). Biology: A Global Approach. Essex: Pearson Education Limited.

· Carvalho, A., Caserotti, P., Carvalho, C., Abade, E., & Sampaio, J. (2014). “Effect of a Short Time Concentric Versus Eccentric Training Program on Electromyography Activity and Peak Torque of Quadriceps.” Journal of Human Kinetics, 41(1), 5–13. https://doi.org/10.2478/hukin-2014-0027

· Cheung, K., Hume, P. A., & Maxwell, L. (2003). “Delayed Onset Muscle Soreness.” Sports Medicine, 33(2), 145–164. https://doi.org/10.2165/00007256-200333020-00005

· Clayton, H.M. (1991). “Conditioning Sport Horses.” Mason, USA: Sport Horse Publications.

· Damas, F., Phillips, S. M., Libardi, C. A., Vechin, F. C., Lixandrão, M. E., Jannig, P. R., Ugrinowitsch, C. (2016). “Resistance training-induced changes in integrated myofibrillar protein synthesis are related to hypertrophy only after attenuation of muscle damage.” The Journal of Physiology, 594(18), 5209–5222. https://doi.org/10.1113/JP272472

· Damas, F., Libardi, C. A., & Ugrinowitsch, C. (2017). “The development of skeletal muscle hypertrophy through resistance training: the role of muscle damage and muscle protein synthesis.” European Journal of Applied Physiology, 118(3), 485–500. https://doi.org/10.1007/s00421-017-3792-9

· Hinchcliff, K. W., Kaneps, A. J., & Geor, R. J. (2008). “Equine Exercise Physiology: The Science of Exercise in the Athletic Horse.” Edinburgh: Saunders/Elsevier.

· Hwang, P. S., Andre, T. L., McKinley-Barnard, S. K., Morales Marroquín, F. E., Gann, J. J., Song, J. J., & Willoughby, D. S. (2017). “Resistance Training–Induced Elevations in Muscular Strength in Trained Men Are Maintained After 2 Weeks of Detraining and Not Differentially Affected by Whey Protein Supplementation.” Journal of Strength and Conditioning Research, 31(4), 869–881. https://doi.org/10.1519/JSC.0000000000001807

· Martini, F. H., Nath, J. L., & Bartholomew, E. F. (2018). Fundamentals of Anatomy & Physiology, Global Edition. In 3-2 Organelles within the cytoplasm perform particular functions (11de editie, pp. 117–129). England: Pearson.6

· Schoenfeld, B. J. (2010). “The Mechanisms of Muscle Hypertrophy and Their Application to Resistance Training. Journal of Strength and Conditioning Research.” 24(10), 2857–2872. https://doi.org/10.1519/JSC.0b013e3181e840f3

· VanMeter, K. C., & Hubert, R. J. (2013). “Gould’s Pathophysiology for the Health Professions .” (5de editie). Canada: Elsevier Health Sciences.



Spierpijn en Spiergroei


Spierpijn, wat is dit precies? Waar komt het vandaan? Hoe lang duurt het? Kan ik mijn paard trainen wanneer hij spierpijn heeft? Groeien de spieren van mijn paard wanneer hij spierpijn heeft? Hoe snel neemt de kracht van de spieren af als ik stop met trainen? Veel ruiters stellen deze vragen. De antwoorden vind je in deze blog.



Een kleine test

We waren erg nieuwsgierig of we spierpijn op een foto konden vastleggen, dus we hebben een kleine test gedaan. We volgden drie dagen lang een merrie, en filmden haar terwijl ze in een rechte lijn draafde over de weg. Op Dag 1 had ze een springles, op Dag 2 en 3 stond ze overdag (08:00 tot 19:00) in haar wei en had een hersteltraining op Dag 2. In draf zagen we de grootste verschillen in beweging. Hieronder zie je een afbeelding met een overzicht van de drie dagen. Je kunt het grootste verschil zien in de hoek van de voorknie (carpus) - hoe groter het getal van de hoek, hoe minder de voorknie gebogen is. In de foto is te zien dat de voorknie van de merrie op Dag 2 het minst gebogen is, dus de hoek is het grootst. De oorzaak hiervan zou spierpijn kunnen zijn.


We observeerden ook een verschil in de buiging van de gewrichten in het achterbeen:

Weer waren de heup en de knie het minst gebogen op Dag 2, terwijl het spronggewricht op alledrie de dagen een evengrote hoek had.


Het paard in de foto ervaarde dus waarschijnlijk spierpijn op Dag 2, aangezien de gewrichten het minst gebogen waren op deze dag.


Dit is natuurlijk een kleine test voor ons geweest, maar om echte conclusies te kunnen trekken uit deze bevindingen, is meer onderzoek nodig. Daarbij zijn er andere symptomen van spierpijn, die wij niet onderzocht hebben.


Wisselende soorten pijn tijdens en na training

Tijdens en na een training kunnen paarden drie verschillende soorten pijn ervaren:

1. Verzuring: Dit is wanneer lactaat niet in staat is het zuur te neutraliseren, dat ontstaat tijdens een training.

2. Spierpijn: zwelling en ontsteking die uiteindelijk leiden tot gewenste spiergroei, zijn één tot twee dagen na training te zien.

3. Pees- en gewrichtspijn: Het paard kan deze pijn tijdens en na de training ervaren, wanneer de warming-up onvoldoende is geweest.


Spierpijn kan leiden tot spierherstel

In de opbouwfase van het trainen, waarin je de spieren van je paard wil laten groeien, train je boven het fitnessniveau. Dit veroorzaakt scheurtjes in de spieren, ook wel 'microschade' genoemd. De volgende stap is dat hierdoor ontstekingen ontstaan, die uiteindelijk leiden tot spiergroei. Daarbij worden ook spiereiwitten geproduceerd, die zorgen voor herstel en groei.

Een paard met spierpijn zal soms wat stijf aanvoelen aan het begin van de training. Het zal minder soepel zijn, en meer moeite hebben met stelling en buiging. Het paard zal ook wat onwillig zijn om voorwaarts te lopen.


Na spierpijn komt spiergroei

Als je langer op dezelfde intensiteit traint, vermindert de spierpijn en vermeerdert de spiergroei (dit heet hypertrofie)


Vermoedelijk groeit een spier als volgt:

In de eerste week dat je start met een meer intensief trainingsschema, zal je paard een relatief grote hoeveelheid microschade oplopen en een klein beetje spiergroei. De spier zal meer eiwitten aanmaken voor herstel, en minder voor groei.


Als je drie weken op dezelfde intensiteit hebt getraind, zul je meer spiergroei zien en minder microschade.


Na tien weken op dezelfde intensiteit getraind te hebben, neemt de snelheid van de spiergroei toe en vermindert de spierpijn. De eiwitten die de spier produceert, zullen nu meer gefocust zijn op spiergroei.


Deze theorie is afgeleid van een menselijk onderzoek.



Een bepaalde hoeveelheid spierpijn is daarom indirect nodig voor spiergroei. Spierpijn alléén zorgt echter niet voor spiergroei. Het is de kettingreactie die voor spiergroei zorgt, als je twee tot drie weken op hetzelfde niveau traint.


Hoe lang duurt spierpijn eigenlijk?

In het geval van microschade, kan je paard 24 tot 48 uur na de training de grootste hoeveelheid spierpijn ervaren. Tijdens deze periode is het proces om de spieren te herstellen, op zijn piek. Tijdens dit proces zijn ontstekingscellen nodig om de spier te repareren. Dit kan soms zichtbaar zijn als warme en opgezwollen spieren.


Voorbeeld 1: Training opbouwen

Op maandag was je bij een dressuurles met een intensiteit van 80, terwijl het fitnessniveau van je paard 40 is. Je koos hiervoor, omdat je wilt dat je paard een hoger fitnessniveau bereikt. Het beste moment om weer te trainen is op woensdag. Dit is omdat dan de piek van de spierpijn (24 uur) voorbij is. Op de tussenliggende dag kun je je paard vragen om licht gymnastiserende oefeningen te doen, dit heet hersteltraining. Deze trainingen liggen onder het fitnessniveau van je paard. De screenshot hiernaast laat zien hoe de training en het fitnessniveau te zien zijn in Ipos Technology's Trainingsapp. De lijn staat voor het fitnessniveau, en de balken zijn de trainingen.

Voorbeeld 2: Wedstrijden

Het is vrijdag. Op zondag heb je een dressuurwedstrijd. Je hebt hiervoor ook nog een dressuurles gepland staan, maar je weet dat deze trainingen altijd erg intensief zijn voor je paard. Als je doorgaat met de hoge intensiteit dressuurles, kan het zijn dat je paard spierpijn heeft op de dag van de wedstrijd, en hierdoor de dressuurproef waarschijnlijk niet naar zijn beste vermogen kan lopen. In dit scenario is het beter om de intensiteit van je dressuurtraining laag te houden, en ervoor te zorgen dat je niet boven het fitnessniveau van je paard uit komt. Op deze manier voorkom je het scenario waarin je paard misschien spierpijn heeft op de wedstrijd zondag. De wedstrijd zelf zou niet boven je fitnessniveau moeten zijn.

Wat gebeurt er als je te snel weer traint?

De kans op (lichte) blessures zal vergroten als je je paard te vroeg en te intensief weer traint. Als je traint terwijl je paard nog spierpijn heeft, kan de microschade in de spieren zich ophopen. In dit scenario heeft het lichaam van het paard nog niet genoeg tijd gehad om de schade te herstellen. Als de training te zwaar is (bijvoorbeeld als het een trainingslast van 80 heeft, terwijl het fitnessniveau van je paard 40 is), terwijl je paard nog niet hersteld is van een eerdere training, kan je paard tekenen van ongehoorzaamheid laten zien, en kan het zijn dat hij niet voorwaarts wil gaan of wil buigen zoals gewoonlijk. Ipos Technology's Trainingsapp kan je helpen je paard met de juiste hoeveelheid te belasten op de juiste dag. De App berekent het fitnessniveau van je paard. Tussen trainingen specifiek voor je discipline, voeg je een lichte hersteltraining toe. Deze trainingen liggen over het algemeen op of onder het fitnessniveau van je paard.


Wat gebeurt er als je te laat traint?

Het is nooit verkeerd om een extra rustdag in te plannen. De spiermassa neemt pas na twee weken rust af. Hoe langer je wacht met trainen, hoe sneller de spiermassa afneemt. Het duurt dus best lang voordat spiermassa of spierkracht vermindert. Met een goed trainingsschema kom je erachter dat je uiteindelijk niet zo veel of zo zwaar hoeft te trainen als je eerst deed, en dat je toch een hoger fitnessniveau voor je paard kan behalen.

Samenvatting:

· Spierpijn is meestal het herstelproces van spierschade door training.

· Er zijn een aantal soorten pijn tijdens en/of na een training.

· Spierpijn is erger tussen 24 en 48 uur na de training.

· Als je te vroeg weer traint na een intensieve training, hoopt de spierschade zich op, en vermeerdert het risico op blessures.

· Spiermassa vermindert pas na twee weken niet trainen.

· Spierkracht neemt af na drie tot vier weken niet trainen.

Bronnen:

· (In Dutch) Burgerhout, W. G. (2008) Afscheid van melkzuur, deel 1 27: 322. https://doi-org.has.idm.oclc.org/10.1007/BF03077607

· Campbell, N. A., Reece, J. B., Urry, L. A., Cain, M. L., Wasserman, S. A., Minorsky, P. V., & Jackson, R. B. (2014). Biology: A Global Approach. Essex: Pearson Education Limited.

· Carvalho, A., Caserotti, P., Carvalho, C., Abade, E., & Sampaio, J. (2014). “Effect of a Short Time Concentric Versus Eccentric Training Program on Electromyography Activity and Peak Torque of Quadriceps.” Journal of Human Kinetics, 41(1), 5–13. https://doi.org/10.2478/hukin-2014-0027

· Cheung, K., Hume, P. A., & Maxwell, L. (2003). “Delayed Onset Muscle Soreness.” Sports Medicine, 33(2), 145–164. https://doi.org/10.2165/00007256-200333020-00005

· Clayton, H.M. (1991). “Conditioning Sport Horses.” Mason, USA: Sport Horse Publications.

· Damas, F., Phillips, S. M., Libardi, C. A., Vechin, F. C., Lixandrão, M. E., Jannig, P. R., Ugrinowitsch, C. (2016). “Resistance training-induced changes in integrated myofibrillar protein synthesis are related to hypertrophy only after attenuation of muscle damage.” The Journal of Physiology, 594(18), 5209–5222. https://doi.org/10.1113/JP272472

· Damas, F., Libardi, C. A., & Ugrinowitsch, C. (2017). “The development of skeletal muscle hypertrophy through resistance training: the role of muscle damage and muscle protein synthesis.” European Journal of Applied Physiology, 118(3), 485–500. https://doi.org/10.1007/s00421-017-3792-9

· Hinchcliff, K. W., Kaneps, A. J., & Geor, R. J. (2008). “Equine Exercise Physiology: The Science of Exercise in the Athletic Horse.” Edinburgh: Saunders/Elsevier.

· Hwang, P. S., Andre, T. L., McKinley-Barnard, S. K., Morales Marroquín, F. E., Gann, J. J., Song, J. J., & Willoughby, D. S. (2017). “Resistance Training–Induced Elevations in Muscular Strength in Trained Men Are Maintained After 2 Weeks of Detraining and Not Differentially Affected by Whey Protein Supplementation.” Journal of Strength and Conditioning Research, 31(4), 869–881. https://doi.org/10.1519/JSC.0000000000001807

· Martini, F. H., Nath, J. L., & Bartholomew, E. F. (2018). Fundamentals of Anatomy & Physiology, Global Edition. In 3-2 Organelles within the cytoplasm perform particular functions (11de editie, pp. 117–129). England: Pearson.6

· Schoenfeld, B. J. (2010). “The Mechanisms of Muscle Hypertrophy and Their Application to Resistance Training. Journal of Strength and Conditioning Research.” 24(10), 2857–2872. https://doi.org/10.1519/JSC.0b013e3181e840f3

· VanMeter, K. C., & Hubert, R. J. (2013). “Gould’s Pathophysiology for the Health Professions .” (5de editie). Canada: Elsevier Health Sciences.

Moving together.

Subscribe to our mailinglist
  • Facebook
  • YouTube
  • Instagram