Train with Intensity and Fitness Level

Scrol omlaag voor Nederlands


Do you ever wonder why your horse’s muscle development stops at a certain point? You train and train, and yet your horse may have poorly developed muscles. Did you know that you also can train a horse too much? So much so, that the horse can actually lose muscle mass? In this blog, you can find out how you can ensure that this does not happen. Ipos Technology’s Training App can help you with this.


Summary:

· Training Load indicates how heavy a training was (calculated by Ipos Technology’s Training App).

· Fitness level is assessed from the average Training Load, as measured over 21 days. The Ipos Training App calculates this for you.

· Increase your horse's fitness level by gradually increasing the Training Load per week (progressive loading).

· The ratio between the Training Load of a workout and the fitness of your horse determines how many rest days the horse needs (supercompensation). When training at the wrong time (in Phase 2, or after Phase 4), the horse’s muscle power will deteriorate.

Ipos Technology’s Training App calculates the Training Load.

Training Load is, in brief, a value that indicates how heavy a training was for your horse. If you know the load of one training (and your horse’s fitness level), you can estimate how intense the training was for your horse and determine how many days your horse needs rest. Ipos Technology’s Training App helps by calculating the intensity of the training for you.

The Ipos Training App uses a formula that is derived from heart-rate research to calculate the intensity of each training. It is based on the number of minutes that your horse spends per gait. Not every gait is equally intensive, so every gait ‘weighs’ differently into the overall Training Load.


Heart-rate measurements have been used for many years to monitor the condition of a horse. To fully use a heart-rate monitor effectively, you need a lot of knowledge, and this is not for everyone. However, this knowledge has been useful in calculating the Training Load for horses. In this way, we know from the literature that the heart beats on average per gait are as follows:


1. Rest: 28 tot 40 beats per minute.

2. Walk: 70 to 90 beats per minute.

3. Trot: 120 to 140 beats per minute.

4. Canter: 170 to 190 beats per minute.

5. Gallop: Max 240 beats per minute.


As you can imagine, the higher the heart-rate of the horse, the higher the intensity of the training. When the strain on the horse is too high, the horse is more likely to incur injuries but, when it is too low, the horse will not improve fitness and muscle size.

‘Fitness’ is the average load over 21 days of training

When you have trained for 21 days with the Ipos Technology Training App, you can calculate your horse’s fitness level by averaging all the trainings you have done over the past 21 days. When you do not train, the App inserts an intensity of 0 in the calculation. Calculating a fitness level is most reliable if you just train as you always do.

Example:

It is important that when you are competing, the strain during the tests does not exceed your fitness level. So, you prevent your horse from getting tired during a test. Let’s assume that the fitness level of your horse is 50. You decide to train with the Ipos Training App and also use the App during a competition. You found that the Training Load of the competition was actually 80! While your fitness level is 50. So it is logical that your horse becomes tired not only after the competition, but during it as well. The event is too heavy for the horse, Now you know this, you can start building up your training more progressively, until you have a fitness level of 80, so your horse can complete the competition without fatigue.

Increase your horse’s fitness level through progressive loading

You can increase your horse's fitness level step-by-step by adding a bit more load every week.

There are two terms that are important to understand:

1. Progressive loading: means you gradually intensify your training, so you avoid over training and associated injuries.

2. Super compensation: helps you to define the moment the body recovers above its original fitness level; this is the perfect moment for a subsequent workout.

Super compensation

You can imagine the higher the heart rate of the horse, the higher the intensity of the training. When the strain on the horse is too high you are more likely to have injuries but, when it is too low, your horse will not improve fitness and muscle size.




Super compensation consists of four phases:

Phase 1: Where the line starts is your training. During this training, your horse gets tired and the muscles become slightly damaged. This stage takes about one hour.

Phase 2: After the training, the body will recover. This phase takes approximately 24 to 48 hours (depending upon the intensity of your training). It is counted from the end of your training.

Phase 3: Here you find the actual super compensation. The muscles have grown and are stronger than before the training. This is the ideal time for a subsequent training. This phase lasts 36 to 72 hours, counted from your last workout.

Phase 4: If you wait too long with the next training, the fitness level will gradually decrease, and you will not be able to build up your training. This phase takes three to seven days, counted from your training. This is described for humans, but can also be applied to horses. If you train at the right moment, you will discover that your horse is getting fitter, it will have more energy in the training, and will be more cheerful in the field or stable.

The right shows this upward line schematically. This shows what happens when you train at the right time (Phase 3). There is a rising line (this is a horse with a nice muscular neck and backside developing). The graphs also show what happens if you train too early (Phase 2). The result is a descending line (with characteristic poorly muscled in neck and backside). Thus, the strength of your horse will actually decrease, as the rising line increases. If your horse repeatedly gets minor injuries, this can be a sign of overtraining. You may be trying to train intensively too early.

Progressive loading

Progressive loading refers to building up your training gradually over time. Every fortnight, you can increase either frequency, duration or intensity. However, it is important not to increase these three all at once. In Phase 3 (see Figure 1. supercompensation), there is a small peak. This is the most convenient time to start training again. At this point, you can also make your training a bit more intense (progressive loading). However, it should be remembered that your training only needs to be assessed once a week.

It takes years to build up fitness to a professional level

A horse used professionally can train longer and more frequently, because they are accustomed to it. When these horses started their training of course, they also could not achieve the same training regimes. After several years of training at the right loading, applied at the right time, the professional trainer has slowly built up the horse’s training intensity (using progressive loading), so that the horse can now train for an hour (or perhaps more) a day. These horses also have to deliver very intense performance at competitions, and sometimes over three consecutive days. However, even for them, the strain of these competitions is preferably not above their fitness level, so that horses competed professionally can perform the tasks asked of them during the actual competition with comparative ease.

Sport horse versus riding school horse

Riding school horses are often underappreciated. Some people assume that riding lessons are not heavy for a riding school horse without realizing that these horses often have to work two to three times a day for an hour at each time. We wanted to test the difference in intensity of work load between a riding school horse with a that of a sport horse using Ipos Technology’s Training App while training or participating in riding lessons.

As you can see in the graphs below, the riding school horse works far more. So this horse’s calculated fitness level (the average of 21 days) is also higher (horizontal line), compared to the average sport horse. The vertical bars represent the load of the training per day. The sport horse has one training per day, while a riding school horse is required to complete two or three lessons per day. If we zoom in on the fitness levels, the fitness level of a sport horse will gradually increase by means of progressive loading of the horse. The fitness level of a riding horse will remain approximately the same, because the riding school horse has already reached a high enough level to perform the work on a daily basis.


References:

· Bompa, T. O., & Buzzichelli, C. (2018). Periodization-6th Edition: Theory and Methodology of Training. Melloy: Human Kinetics. Pp. 12-19.

· Brezhnev, Yu. V., Zaitsev, A. A., & Sazonov, S. V. (2011). “To the analytical theory of the supercompensation phenomenon.” Biophysics, 56(2), 298–303. https://doi.org/10.1134/S0006350911020072

· Clayton, H.M. (1991). “Conditioning sport horses.” Mason, USA: Sport Horse Publications.

· Damas, F., Libardi, C. A., & Ugrinowitsch, C. (2018, 1 maart). “The development of skeletal muscle hypertrophy through resistance training: the role of muscle damage and muscle protein.” Geraadpleegd 27 juni 2019, van https://link.springer.com/article/10.1007%2Fs00421-017-3792-9

· Equine Support International (2017 maart). “Improve your horse: Can less training mean more?” HQ, (120). Geraadpleegd van https://www.equinesupportinternational.com/wp-content/uploads/2017/03/Dutch-professionals-1-Carolien-Munsters.pdf

· Kentucky Equine Research. (2017, 28 December). “From the Heart.” Geraadpleegd 27 juni 2019, van https://ker.com/equinews/from-the-heart/

· Kraemer, W.J., Ratamess, N.A. & French, D.N. Curr Sports Med Rep (2002) 1: 165. https://doi-org.has.idm.oclc.org/10.1007/s11932-002-0017-7

· Munsters, C. (2013). “How challenging is a riding horse’s life? Field studies on workload, fitness and welfare.” Veghel: Druko drukkerij B.V.

· van Dam, K. G. (2006). “Training Induced Adaptations in Horse Skeletal Muscle.” datawyse, universitaire Pers Maastricht. Pp. 3.



Train met Intensiteit en Fitnessniveau



Vraag je je ooit af waarom de spierontwikkeling van je paard op een gegeven moment stopt? Je traint en traint, en toch kan je paard onderontwikkelde spieren hebben. Wist je dat je een paard ook te veel kan trainen? Zo veel zelfs, dat je paard spiermassa kwijtraakt? In deze blog kun je lezen hoe je ervoor kan zorgen dat dit niet gebeurt. Ipos Technology's Trainingsapp kan je hierbij helpen.


Samenvatting:

· Trainingslast laat zien hoe zwaar een training was (berekend door Ipos Technology's Trainingsapp).

· Fitnessniveau wordt bepaald vanuit de gemiddelde Trainingslast, zoals gemeten over 21 dagen. De Ipos Trainingsapp berekent dit voor je.

· Verbeter het fitnessniveau van je paard door geleidelijk de Trainingslast per week te verhogen (progressieve belasting).

· De ratio tussen de Trainingslast van een training en de fitheid van je paard, bepaalt hoe veel rustdagen het paard nodig heeft (supercompensatie). Wanneer je op het verkeerde moment traint (in Fase 2 of na Fase 4), zal de spierkracht van het paard verslechteren.

Ipos Technology’s Training App calculates the Training Load.

Ipos Technology's Trainingsapp berekent de Trainingslast

Trainingslast is, in het kort, een waarde die laat zien hoe zwaar een training was voor je paard. Als de de belasting van één training (en het fitnessniveau van je paard) weet, kun je schatten hoe intensief de training was voor je paard, en bepalen hoe veel dagen je paard rust nodig heeft. Ipos Technology's Trainingsapp helpt door de intensiteit van de training voor jou te berekenen.


De Ipos Trainingsapp gebruikt een formule die voortkomt uit hartslagonderzoek om de intensiteit van elke training te berekenen. Deze is gebaseerd op het aantal minuten dat je paard per gang doorbrengt. Niet elke gang is even intensief, dus elke gang 'weegt' anders in de algemene Trainingslast.

Hartslagmetingen worden al vele jaren gebruikt om de conditie van een paard te monitoren. Om een hartslagmonitor echt effectief te gebruiken, heb je veel kennis nodig, en dit is niet voor iedereen. Deze kennis is echter nuttig geweest bij het berekenen van de Trainingslast voor paarden. Hierdoor weten we uit de literatuur dat de hartslag per gang gemiddeld als volgt is:

1. Rust: 28 tot 40 slagen per minuut.

2. Stap: 70 tot 90 slagen per minuut.

3. Draf: 120 tot 140 slagen per minuut.

4. Galop: 170 tot 190 slagen per minuut.

5. Rengalop: Max. 240 slagen per minuut.


Zoals je je wel kunt voorstellen, hoe hoger de hartslag van het paard is, des te hoger is de intensiteit van de training. Als de inspanning voor het paard te hoog is, loopt het paard meer risico om blessures op te lopen, maar als deze te laag is, zullen de fitheid en spiergrootte van het paard niet toenemen.


'Fitheid' is de gemiddelde belasting over 21 dagen training

Als de 21 dagen met de Ipos Technology Trainingsapp hebt getraind, kun je het fitnessniveau van je paard berekenen door het gemiddelde te nemen van alle training in de afgelopen 21 dagen. Wanneer je niet traint, voegt de App in de berekening een intensiteit van 0 in. Het berekenen van een fitnessniveau is het meest betrouwbaar als je gewoon traint zoals je dat altijd doet.


Voorbeeld:

Het is belangrijk dat de inspanning van de proeven niet hoger is dan je fitnessniveau, wanneer je wedstrijden rijdt. Op die manier voorkom je dat je paard moe wordt tijdens een proef. Stel dat het fitnessniveau van je paard 50 is. Je besluit met de Ipos Trainingsapp te trainen en gebruikt de App ook tijdens een wedstrijd. Je komt erachter dat de Trainingslast van de wedstrijd in werkelijkheid 80 is! En dat terwijl jouw fitnessniveau 50 is. Het is dus logisch dat je paard niet alleen na, maar ook tijdens de wedstrijd moe is. Het evenement is te zwaar voor je paard. Nu je dit weet, kun je beginnen je training progressiever op te bouwen tot je een fitnessniveau van 80 hebt, zodat je paard de wedstrijd kan lopen zonder vermoeidheid.


Het fitnessniveau van je paard verhogen door progressieve belasting

Je kunt het fitnessniveau van je paard stap voor stap verhogen door elke week een beetje meer belasting toe te voegen.


Er zijn twee termen die belangrijk zijn om te begrijpen:

1. Progressieve belasting betekent dat je geleidelijk aan je training intensiever maakt, zodat je overtrainen en verwante blessures voorkomt.

2. Supercompensatie helpt je om het moment te bepalen dat het lichaam zich herstelt boven het originele fitnessniveau; dit is het perfecte moment voor een volgende training.


Supercompensatie

Je kunt je voorstellen dat hoe hoger de hartslag van het paard is, des te hoger is de intensiteit van de training. Als de inspanning voor je paard te hoog is, loop je meer risico op blessures, maar wanneer deze te laag is, zullen de fitheid en spiergrootte van het paard niet toenemen.






Supercompensatie bestaat uit vier fasen:

Fase 1: Waar de lijn begint, is je training. Tijdens deze training raakt je paard vermoeid en de spieren beschadigen licht. Dit stadium duurt ongeveer een uur.

Fase 2: Na de training zal het lichaam herstellen. Deze fase duurt ongeveer 24 tot 48 uur (afhankelijk van de intensiteit van je training). Er wordt geteld vanaf het einde van je training.

Fase 3: Hier vind je de daadwerkelijke supercompensatie. De spieren zijn gegroeid en zijn sterker dan voor de training. Dit is het ideale moment voor een volgende training. Deze fase duurt 36 tot 72 uur, geteld vanaf je laatste training.

Fase 4: Als je te lang wacht met de volgende training, zal het fitnessniveau geleidelijk afnemen, en je zal je training niet kunnen opbouwen. Deze fase duurt drie tot zeven dagen, geteld vanaf je training. Dit is beschreven voor mensen, maar kan ook op paarden worden toegepast. Als je op het juiste moment traint, zul je merken dat je paard fitter wordt, meer energie heeft tijdens de training, en vrolijker is in de wei of op stal.

De afbeelding rechts laat deze opwaartse lijn schematisch zien. Deze laat zien wat er gebeurt als je op het juiste moment traint (Fase 3). Er is een stijgende lijn (dit is een paard dat een goede, bespierde nek en achterhand ontwikkelt). De grafiek laat ook zien wat er gebeurt als je te vroeg traint (Fase 2). Het gevolg is een dalende lijn (met karakteristieke slecht bespierde nek en achterhand). De kracht van je paard zal dus in feite afnemen, zoals de stijgende lijn toeneemt. Als je paard regelmatig kleine blessures heeft, kan dit een teken zijn van overtrainen. Het kan zijn dat je te vroeg weer intensief probeert te trainen.


Progressieve belasting

Progressieve belasting verwijst naar het geleidelijk opbouwen van je training in de loop van de tijd. Elke twee weken kun je óf de frequentie, óf de duur, óf de intensiteit verhogen. Het is echter belangrijk deze drie niet allemaal tegelijk te verhogen. In Fase 3 (zie figuur 1. supercompensatie) is er een kleine piek. Dit is het meest gunstige moment om weer te gaan trainen. Op dit punt kun je je training ook een beetje intensiever maken (progressieve belasting). Het is echter goed te onthoudend dat je training maar één keer per week bepaald hoeft te worden.


Het kost jaren om fitheid tot een professioneel niveau op te bouwen

Een paard dat professioneel wordt gebruikt, kan langer en vaker trainen, omdat ze eraan gewend zijn. Toen deze paarden met hun training begonnen, konden ze natuurlijk ook nog niet dezelfde trainingsregimes aan. Na jaren training met de juiste belasting, toegepast op het juiste moment, heeft de professionele trainer langzaamaan de trainingsintensiteit van het paard opgebouwd (met gebruik van progressieve belasting), zodat het paar nu een uur per dag (of misschien wel meer) kan trainen. Deze paarden moeten ook heel intensieve prestaties leveren op wedstrijden, en soms op drie opeenvolgende dagen. Toch is de inspanning van deze wedstrijden bij voorkeur zelfs voor hen niet boven hun fitnessniveau, zodat professioneel uitgebrachte paarden de opdrachten die hen tijdens wedstrijden gegeven worden, relatief gemakkelijk kunnen uitvoeren.


Sportpaard versus manegepaard

Manegepaarden worden vaak ondergewaardeerd. Sommige mensen gaan ervan uit dat lessen niet zwaar zijn voor een manegepaard, zonder zich te realiseren dat deze paarden vaak twee tot drie keer per dag een uur moeten werken. We wilden het verschil in intensiteit testen tussen de belasting van een manegepaard en die van een sportpaard, met gebruik van Ipos Technology's Trainingsapp tijdens het trainen of deelnemen aan een manegeles.


Zoals je hieronder kunt zien, werkt het manegepaard veel meer. Het berekende fitnessniveau (het gemiddelde van 21 dagen) van dit paard is dus ook hoger (horizontale lijn), in vergelijking met het gemiddelde sportpaard. De verticale balken laten de trainingslast per dag zien. Het sportpaard heeft één training per dag, terwijl het manegepaard twee of drie lessen per dag moet volbrengen. Als we inzoomen op de fitnessniveaus, zal het fitnessniveau van een sportpaard geleidelijk verhogen door middel van progressieve belasting van het paard. Het fitnessniveau van een manegepaard zal ongeveer hetzelfde blijven, omdat het manegepaard al een hoog genoeg fitnessniveau heeft berreikt om het dagelijkse werk uit te kunnen voeren.


Bronnen:

· Bompa, T. O., & Buzzichelli, C. (2018). Periodization-6th Edition: Theory and Methodology of Training. Melloy: Human Kinetics. Pp. 12-19.

· Brezhnev, Yu. V., Zaitsev, A. A., & Sazonov, S. V. (2011). “To the analytical theory of the supercompensation phenomenon.” Biophysics, 56(2), 298–303. https://doi.org/10.1134/S0006350911020072

· Clayton, H.M. (1991). “Conditioning sport horses.” Mason, USA: Sport Horse Publications.

· Damas, F., Libardi, C. A., & Ugrinowitsch, C. (2018, 1 maart). “The development of skeletal muscle hypertrophy through resistance training: the role of muscle damage and muscle protein.” Geraadpleegd 27 juni 2019, van https://link.springer.com/article/10.1007%2Fs00421-017-3792-9

· Equine Support International (2017 maart). “Improve your horse: Can less training mean more?” HQ, (120). Geraadpleegd van https://www.equinesupportinternational.com/wp-content/uploads/2017/03/Dutch-professionals-1-Carolien-Munsters.pdf

· Kentucky Equine Research. (2017, 28 December). “From the Heart.” Geraadpleegd 27 juni 2019, van https://ker.com/equinews/from-the-heart/

· Kraemer, W.J., Ratamess, N.A. & French, D.N. Curr Sports Med Rep (2002) 1: 165. https://doi-org.has.idm.oclc.org/10.1007/s11932-002-0017-7

· Munsters, C. (2013). “How challenging is a riding horse’s life? Field studies on workload, fitness and welfare.” Veghel: Druko drukkerij B.V.

· van Dam, K. G. (2006). “Training Induced Adaptations in Horse Skeletal Muscle.” datawyse, universitaire Pers Maastricht. Pp. 3.


Moving together.

Subscribe to our mailinglist
arrow&v
  • Facebook
  • YouTube
  • Instagram